Lime Drizzle Cupcakes

I love limes.  They look beautiful – I could happily keep a bowl of limes on the table just to look at!  But I love their taste and sharpness just as much, and they enhance so many things – giving a lovely sharp, fresh lift to savoury dishes and salads. And of course on the sweeter side – lime and coconut, candied lime zest, lime cordial (home-made of course!) and not to forget a glass of sloe gin with tonic and a few slices of lime….but, I digress!

I found a recipe for Lime Drizzle Cupcakes in an old issue of Cupcake Heaven Magazine – they credit the recipe to the book Cupcakes and Mini Cakes.  Lemon drizzle cake is heavenly, but the lure of limes was strong.  I had to try this.  I was in love before I even started.

This is one of those recipes where you fling everything in a bowl and just blitz it. Another bonus! Quick and easy, not complicated, that’s the sort of recipe I like.

I did a minor deviation from the recipe by adding some of this: P1000970

It is a wonderful sharp lime extract, and difficult to resist using 🙂

I followed the rest of the recipe exactly.  Even with hindsight, there is nothing I can tweak, it is just right.

By the time I’d done this (it really doesn’t take long – for “cupcakes in a hurry” its a great recipe to try) I began to doubt myself – it didn’t look as if there was enough batter.  The recipe says if makes 12 cupcakes, I managed 11.  Of course I could have put slightly less batter in each cupcake case……and into the oven they went.


Once baked, the cupcakes are moved to a wire rack to cool and drizzled with a lime syrup.  I added more lime juice than the recipe stated (would you expect anything less?!) but because of this I heated the syrup to thicken it slightly.  It still turned out fine.  The cupcakes are light and have a lovely sharp lime flavour.  No embellishment needed!

Wherever you are, whatever you are doing, I wish you a peaceful weekend 🙂



64 things I wish someone had told me about grief

A not so happy subject this one, but one which people don’t talk about. Grief. Loss. Bereavement.

Over the last two years far too many people I love have died – close friends and family.  There have been times when I have longed to be able to talk to a friend, just to say this is happening, this is how I feel. Not to get an answer, a solution, but just to briefly get support, someone who hears what I say, who understands, who offers friendship.  What I have learned is that friends let you down.  Not out of malice but because – I’m guessing – they can’t deal with it, they don’t know what to say.  This compounds the hurt.

I did however find this website with a list entitled “64 things I wish someone had told me about grief”. This. Yes, this.  Everyone going through grief, loss, bereavement should be shown this.


Pistachio Shortbread

This is one of those recipes which turns out differently every time I make it.  Today I actually thought it would be a fail (jinxed by last week?). But no, it worked.  I got the recipe from one of the fabulous series of publications by Australian Women’s Weekly – this one entitled “Wicked Sweet Indulgences”.  How could I resist with a title like that?!


This is where I admit I neither like, nor dislike pistachios.  But I love their pink and green colour. Well, that’s me, shallow to a T.  Show me a pretty colour and I’m yours!

Remember not to play with your food……………


This recipe contains – apart from cake flour – rice flour, cornflour and ground almonds.  These help create a lovely, light, crumbly texture.

Beat together butter and icing sugar until light and fluffy.

Add the flour, cornflour, rice flour and ground almonds.


Mix in the chopped toasted pistachios, spoon onto the baking trays in mounds and bake.


I was supposed to keep aside some pistachios to place on the top of the shortbread before baking, but I threw them all into the mixture.  Sometimes you just have to!!

Wherever you are, whatever you are doing, I wish you a peaceful day 🙂


Cheese Scones

Before you read any further, I must warn you, this is a baking fail. Not a fail as in everyone who ate my cheese scones died a long slow agonising death….but a fail as in lack of baking success. The scones are perfectly edible, we are all still alive and healthy (relatively so anyway……) but they did not turn out the way I hoped they would. This happens.


I have a go-to scone recipe which I use all the time. It is quick, easy, the scones are light, I’ve adapted it for sweet or savoury and it always works.  The recipe uses oil instead of butter and this results in a wetter dough, which can’t be neatly cut and shaped, but instead is dolloped from a spoon onto the baking tray.  But, looks aren’t everything!

I do from time to time wish however, that my scones looked beautiful and neat.  To do that I would need to use a different recipe.  One which uses butter, and the “rubbing in” method.  After a lengthy consultation with Aunty Google, I chose a recipe for cheese scones which had the word “ultimate” in their title.  Well, there’s a promise!

My only deviation from the recipe was to use less cheese – yes, even I can’t believe I did that.  The quantity seemed to much, and I cut it by a third.  I am glad I did, as I cannot see how the extra cheese could have worked at all.

I did the “rubbing in” bit, but, life is too short really to “rub in”, isn’t it.  So I used my handy tool equivalent (what on earth is it called? I haven’t a clue).


Once the required breadcrumb texture had been achieved, I mixed in the grated cheese and the milk.  I began to panic….this didn’t look enough. 12 to 16 scones the recipe said….the dough was very dry and I had to add a bit more milk.  I was worried I’d add too much milk and the dough would be too wet, and I’d feel I’d have to add more flour….and, you know how it goes, we’ve all been there!

Finally I managed to get the dough to come together enough that I could pat it out on a board and cut out my scones.


Now those (don’t look at the cracks please!) look nice and neat.  But I only managed to get 10 (medium size) scones out of the dough.  12 to 16 would have been teeny tiny midget scones…. and into the oven they went.

The colour looked fine…..but…BUT…they didn’t rise much.  Why? Baking fail alert!!!  I cut one open – very thin halves because of the lack of rise.  It looked – in my opinion – to be okay texture-wise, it was light, not heavy.  I didn’t bake bricks!  Was there still too much cheese?  I will definitely try this style recipe again, but I’ll source another recipe to see if it makes any difference.


Still, the taste is right – lovely mature cheddar, fresh warm scone, cold salty butter….

Wherever you are, whatever you are doing, I wish you a peaceful day 🙂